Skip to Main Content

Provides a multidimensional theoretical and evidence-based approach to understanding the complex interactions of biological, psychological, spiritual, economic, political and sociocultural forces on the lives of individuals, families and groups in a multicultural society. Required core curriculum course.

First of two generalist courses on social policy, policy practice and practice in communities and organizations. Surveys historical evolution of social welfare policy and contemporary provision of social welfare services, including the role of values in policy formulation and principles of social and economic justice. Introduces the social work role as a change agent in legislative, community and organizational arenas. Uses social/behavioral knowledge and social work intervention models and applies analytical frameworks for assessing program, organizational and policy effectiveness. Develops skills in identification of need, designing strategies for change and policy analysis.

Enhances understanding of and appreciation for diversity in self and others. Addresses issues of power, inequality, privilege and resulting oppression. Analyzes oppression resulting from persistent social, educational, political, religious, economic and legal inequalities. Focuses on the experiences of oppressed groups in the U.S. in order to understand their strengths, needs and responses. Uses a social justice perspective for the study of and practice with oppressed groups. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

Introduces basic knowledge, skills and values necessary to provide a range of restorative, rehabilitative, maintenance and enhancement services in social work practice with individuals, families and groups. Introduces selected practice theories and models to guide intervention. Emphasizes the multidimensional and diverse contexts in which problems and needs are assessed and in which intervention occurs. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

Extends application of beginning knowledge and skills to the phases of intervention with groups and families. Presents knowledge and skills of environmental intervention and termination. Introduces additional selected theories and models for social work practice with individuals, families and groups with attention to special populations and practice evaluation. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

The second of two generalist courses on social policy, policy practice and practice in communities and organizations. Examines values and ethical dilemmas facing professional social workers in organizations, communities and policy-making arenas. Explores legislative/political processes. Develops skills in legislative lobbying, advocacy, design of change strategies and tactics, policy analysis and task group leadership. Emphasizes reciprocal effects of policy on social work practice and implications for social and economic justice.

Introduces the methods of social work research, including problem formulation, research designs, measurement, data collection and sampling. Focuses on the application of critical-thinking skills, diversity and research methods of clinical social work practice effectiveness. Covers evaluation of social work programs and services. Required direct practice core curriculum course.

Covers the life course from conception through late adulthood and/or death. Focuses on the influences of biological, psychological, spiritual, economic, political and sociocultural forces on individual and family coping and adaptation. Provides a multidimensional, multicultural perspective on the behavior of individuals and families based on theory and research with identification of the risk and protective mechanisms that influence development. Required core curriculum course.

Students meet two days per week. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the generalist curriculum.

Students meet two days per week. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the generalist curriculum.

Students meet five days a week, 35 hours per week, for one semester. Enrollment is restricted to part-time students. Provides opportunities to master essential social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes the integration of content from all areas of the generalist curriculum. Completion of course requires 420 structured field hours.

This course reviews the epidemiology, etiology, classification (using the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders V) and course of a range of mental, emotional and behavioral disorders and conditions across the lifespan and the relevance of this knowledge to social work across practice settings. It emphasizes a Biopsychosocial-spiritual assessment, a risk and protective factors framework, a critical analysis of existing and emerging theory, the impact of difference and diversity, an appreciation of the lived experience of these challenges for clients and their families, and the practical implications of this knowledge for relationship-building and treatment planning as well as interdisciplinary collaboration. Introduces knowledge of psychopharmacology. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

Provides a Multitheoretical orientation to intervention across fields of practice with individuals, families, couples and groups. Emphasizes contemporary psychodynamic and cognitive behavioral approaches and their empirical support. Focuses on multidimensional assessment and the differential application of therapeutic, supportive, educational and resource-management strategies to complex problems of children, youth and adults. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

Continues a Multitheoretical orientation to intervention across fields of practice with emphasis on integrated family systems theory and multidimensional family assessment. Focuses on differential application of psychodynamic, cognitive-behavioral and family systems theories to a range of complex client problems and concerns with attention to diverse populations. Introduces basic knowledge of pharmacology related to social work intervention. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

Review of statistical inference and decision-making using univariate and bivariate techniques. Introduction to computer applications for quantitative data and methods of analysis of qualitative data. Application of ethical standards for research involving human participants. Further development of critical-thinking skills in using empirical literature. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

Further development of critical-thinking skills for translating research findings into practice principles and measuring outcomes of clinical practice. Focus on data collection, data analysis, presentation of visual and statistical techniques for qualitative and quantitative research methods, and utilization of findings for improving clinical social work practice. Continued application of statistical inference, integration of empirical research findings and decision-making. Required advanced clinical core curriculum course.

Focuses on advanced policy analysis through an in-depth, focused examination of a particular social policy area or population. Extends basic knowledge and skills of policy formulation, development and impact analysis/evaluation, as these affect practice on behalf of clients. Examines diversity of policy sources; value, political and economic determinants; policy formulation processes; the policy basis for current services; a broad range of potential need domains; and current programs and laws. Integrates knowledge of human behavior and the social environment relevant to the focal policy areas and pays special attention to issues of social and economic justice. Examines current policy issues, advocacy efforts related to these issues and practice strategies for effecting change.

First of a two-course sequence that provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum.

Second of a two-course sequence provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum.

Students meet five days a week for 40 hours per week for one semester. Advanced block field instruction (option for part-time students). Provides opportunities to master advanced social work knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum. Completion of course requires 600 structured field hours.

Students will spend 15 hours per week in the field. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum.

Students will spend 15 hours per week in the field. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum.

Students will spend 15 hours per week in the field. Course provides opportunities to master advanced social work application of theory knowledge, values and skills through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor and monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the concentration curriculum.

Advanced Standing Program Bridge Courses

Students review approaches, principles, techniques and theories of micro social work practice and human behavior. Emphasis is on commonalties and differences among practice modalities, including differential assessment, intervention and evaluation of outcomes. Course includes weekly field instruction integrating seminar. Required advanced standing program core curriculum course.

Presents social work theory and practice focusing on social policy, communities, agencies and interventions in light of principles of social and economic justice. Introduces and analyzes the social work role of policy practitioner with its specific skills and tasks. Demonstrates the importance of understanding the community and the agency in social work practice. Provides skill building in advocacy, planned change, and policy and organizational analysis, as well as weekly field instruction seminar.

Reviews approaches to scientific inquiry in the development of knowledge for social work practice; problem formulation; concepts and operational definitions; measurement validity and reliability; selected social work research designs; planned data collection strategies and procedures. Required advanced standing program core curriculum course.

Enrollment is restricted to students admitted to the advanced standing program. Reviews generalist-level knowledge, attitudes and skills acquired through social work education at the undergraduate level. Requires application, refinement and the active use of content from the advanced standing curriculum through practice under the direction of an agency-based field instructor, monitored by a faculty field liaison. Emphasizes integration of content from all areas of the generalist foundation curriculum. Completion of course requires 200 structured field hours.