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Shelter Not in Place: Solving the LGBTQ Homeless Epidemic

Edge Media Network: Shelter Not in Place: Solving the LGBTQ Homeless Epidemic

As the COVID-19 pandemic exacerbates conditions for LGBTQ youth who are homeless, proposed solutions often fall short, according to Dr. Maurice Gattis, VCU School of Social Work associate professor. “I think more shelters and affordable housing will be created, but it likely won't be enough and there is still no agreed-upon definition of affordable housing. … Public housing is currently being demolished in cities across America without being replaced, which decreases the affordable housing stock.”

Monday, October 19, 2020

VCU SW news

Dallas Voice: Easing anxiety in LGBTQ youth

Dr. Maurice Gattis, VCU School of Social Work associate professor, addresses how the pandemic, politics and social movements are affecting LGBTQ+ youth. “Youth are leading the way in shaping the current political climate. The calls for equality, racial justice, LGBTQ+ rights and climate justice all have strong youth involvement and leadership.”

Friday, August 21, 2020

VCU SW news

NBC News: 'Powerful in its Simplicity' - As the pandemic endures, mayors call for guaranteed income

A coalition of mayors from around the country is exploring the model of guaranteed income – monthly funds to help fight poverty and close the racial wealth gap. But, says Dr. Maurice Gattis, VCU School of Social Work associate professor, monthly checks may not help those like homeless or housing-insecure youth who don’t have permanent addresses or banking accounts.

Thursday, March 26, 2020

After the Pandemic - Meat Shortages Building More Market Connections

Progressive Farmer: After the Pandemic - Meat Shortages Building More Market Connections

COVID-19 has changed all the rules about how food gets from farm to table, and increasingly farmers will be selling more beef directly to consumers, says Dr. Basil Gooden, a visiting scholar at the VCU School of Social Work, specializing in sustainable food access. ”If you can sell directly to the people who will cook and consume your product, that is ideal. You develop a relationship with that end consumer,” says Gooden, a former Virginia Secretary of Agriculture, who owns 80 head of cattle on his family farm.

Wednesday, March 18, 2020

Disney-Pixar's First Official LGBTQ+ Character Is a Start, but There's More to Be Done

Popsugar: Disney-Pixar's First Official LGBTQ+ Character Is a Start, but There's More to Be Done

The Pixar movie Onward features an openly gay character, Officer Specter. But Dr. Maurice Gattis, VCU School of Social Work associate professor, says the significance is diminished by a bit role with only a few seconds of screen time. “The superficial nature of the relationship may be a letdown for the … LGBTQ+ community. …”

Wednesday, March 11, 2020

How to Switch Careers to Social Work in the Age of Covid-19

Vault: How to Switch Careers to Social Work in the Age of Covid-19

As the COVID-19 pandemic has grown, so has the need for social workers, who serve communities, families and individuals. Getting the advanced graduate degree opens more doors, according to VCU School of Social Work’s dean, Dr. Beth Angell. “An MSW degree provides the skills needed to help people adjust to a variety of life challenges and the tools to practice independently with an LCSW license,” she says.

Sunday, January 12, 2020

Why the nation should screen all students for trauma like California does

The Conversation: Why the nation should screen all students for trauma like California does

With the surgeon general of California pushing an unprecedented plan to implement universal screenings for childhood trauma for children in the state’s Medicaid program, VCU School of Social Work associate professor Dr. Sunny Shin sees a model for the nation. “If all the country’s children could undergo developmentally appropriate screenings for what we in the medical and social work communities call adverse childhood experiences,” he writes, “I suggest, based on my research, millions of tax dollars could be saved every year, premature deaths and diseases could be prevented and schools would be healthier, happier places for students and teachers.”

Sunday, November 17, 2019

The Actual Harms of Vaping

The Atlantic: The Actual Harms of Vaping

Dr. Sunny Shin, a VCU School of Social Work associate professor, says research indicates some young people are actually switching to cigarettes because they are scared of vaping. “This is a good moment to establish the regulatory structure for these vaping products that should have been in place since the beginning,” says Shin, an expert in substance abuse who studies tobacco use by youth.

Tuesday, October 1, 2019